Take Action to Prevent Fall-Related Injuries

Posted on Sep 4, 2015

Mature couple hand in hand, splashing in surf, smilingBy Chris Graham
Eden Medical Center

Fall-related injuries are a serious health threat to older adults, who are five times more likely to be hospitalized after a fall than for any other accident.

At least 20 to 30 percent of falls in older adults lead to serious injuries, such as hip fractures and head injuries.

What can you do to prevent a fall? Safeguard your independence by reducing your risks at home and in your daily activities. Read More

Your Child’s Back-to-School Health and Safety Checklist

Posted on Sep 1, 2015

drhills-114Lisa A. Hills, M.D., Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation pediatrician, recommends:

  • Annual physical exam: Your pediatrician will discuss your child’s height, body mass index, vision, hearing and blood pressure as well as discuss sports-related issues with student athletes and important emotional/behavioral issues with and teens.
  • Vaccinations: Check to see if your child is missing any required immunizations. Also ask about immunizations that are recommended but not required, such as the flu vaccine.
  • Emergency contact information: Your child’s school should have up-to-date emergency numbers, including the contact information for you and your pediatrician as well as a list of your child’s medications, physical impairments and medical conditions.
  • Child passenger safety: Buckling children in age- and size-appropriate car seats, booster seats and seat belts reduce serious and fatal injuries by more than half.
  • Pedestrian safety: Children 9 or younger should always cross the street with an adult. The safest place for your child to cross the street is at a street corner or intersection. At any street crossing, before stepping off the curb, your child should stop and look left-right-left to see if any cars are coming.
  • Backpack tips: Carrying a backpack shouldn’t be a workout for your child. Pack the bag as lightly as possible, with heavier items in the center compartment. The load should never be more than 10% to 20% of her body weight. Backpacks with wheels are a good option.
  • Hand washing: Prevent the spread of germs at school. Teach your child proper hand washing technique: Rub hands together with soap under warm running water for at least 20 seconds. Remind your kids to cough and sneeze into their sleeves and send them to school with antiviral hand gel to use frequently.
  • Sleep schedule: A lack of sleep can negatively affect school performance. Be sure to get your kids on a regular sleep schedule. Limit nighttime TV, video games, cell phone chats or anything that prevents your child from getting a good night’s rest.

Find the right pediatrician for your child.

Sutter Delta Staff Making an Impact Abroad

Posted on Aug 3, 2015

Thanks to current and former Sutter Delta associates who recently traveled to the Philippines with Holy Rosary International Medical Missions based in Antioch:

  • Liberacion Albinda
  • Fe Albinda, RN
  • Andrew Prieto
  • Pacita Aducayen
  • Aileen Hayes, RN.

These volunteers were part of a team that incorporated dentists, local health care workers and a vision care program. Over 11 days, the team saw 3,021 medical patients, extracted 2,145 teeth and distributed 607 pairs of reading glasses. Local ophthalmologists joined the team for two days and will be scheduling surgical clinics for patients identified during the mission.

The team brought approximately $470,000 in medications and supplies with them. Unused supplies were donated to a local clinic in one town and a clinic run by the Dominican Sisters in Iloilo.

Ask the Expert: Are You at Risk for a Urinary Tract Infection?

Posted on Jul 29, 2015

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Jonathan Lynne, M.D., MPH, Family Medicine, Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation

Q: I’ve heard urinary tract infections (UTIs) are getting harder to treat. Why is this and who’s at risk of developing one?

Jonathan Lynne, M.D., MPH, answered:

UTIs are one of the most common infections doctors treat: More than half of women living in the United States will get a UTI. Urinary tract infections are caused by microorganisms—usually bacteria—that enter the urethra and bladder, causing inflammation and infection. UTIs are more common in women because women have a shorter urethra than men do. That means bacteria travel a shorter dAistance to a woman’s bladder. Read More

Wound Care’s Healing Tree Reaches Out to Patients

Posted on Jul 20, 2015

Stop by and see The Healing Tree at the Advanced Wound Care and Hyperbaric Chambers Center.This campaign encourages and motivates patient engagement — while adding beauty to the center.

The Healing Tree is part of patients’ healing celebration. Each patient can write their name and healing date on a leaf and place it on the tree. After a few months, we enclose their leaf in a message of well wishes from the wound care team and mail it to their home.

We hope this connection after the patient has left us reminds them their healing team is here for them should they need us. We also hope this campaign will continue to increase our overall patient satisfaction scores and the likelihood that patients will refer our services to others.

Another Big Thank You from Orin Allen Youth Rehabilitation Facility

Posted on Jul 6, 2015

-submitted by Joe Young, Orin Allen Rehabilitation Facility event organizer

SM4Thanks to Dean Javier, Sutter Delta’s rehab and physical therapy director, Jennifer Bidmead, Sutter Urgent Care medical assistant and Debbie Jarrell, Women’s Health Center R.N., for volunteering their time to speak at Orin Allen Youth Rehabilitation Facility’s Career Day. The response from teachers, staff and students was extremely positive.

Sharing your stories and information about working in the medical field with our residents as they prepare to transition into public life was an invaluable service.

I hope the information you shared will help them pursue positive avenues upon their release and inspire them to explore career options they may not have previously considered.

 

Many residents have asked for books on nursing and other medical careers since your talk, so I think you definitely got through to them and piqued their curiosity.

Sutter Delta Offers Minimally Invasive Treatment for Enlarged Prostate

Posted on Jul 6, 2015

iStock_000018983358SmallUrologists Jonathan L. Chin, M.D. and Sabri Sen, M.D., FACS, of SEBMF, now offer minimally invasive outpatient treatment for enlarged prostate at Sutter Delta.

Benign enlargement of the prostate, common by age 50, blocks urine flow through the urethra. Symptoms include frequent or difficult urination. The UroLift System is an alternative to drug therapy or more invasive surgery, both of which can have permanent side effects.

Patients recover from the procedure quickly and return to their normal routines. To learn more about the Urolift procedure, contact Dr. Chin or Dr. Sen.

Medication is often the first line therapy, but relief can be inadequate and temporary. Side effects can include sexual dysfunction, dizziness and headaches, prompting many patients to quit using the drugs.

The standard alternative treatment is surgery that removes the section of the prostate blocking urine flow. While current surgical options, such as Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP), can be very effective in relieving symptoms, they can also have permanent side effects such as urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction and retrograde ejaculation (dry orgasm).

The UroLift System, performed through the urethra, pushes aside the obstructive prostate lobes and positions small, tailored permanent implants to hold the prostate lobes in the retracted position.

This opens the urethra while leaving the prostate intact. Adverse reactions associated with UroLift System treatment were comparable to other minimally invasive surgical therapies as well as standard cystoscopy.

The most common adverse events reported during the study included pain or burning with urination, blood in the urine, pelvic pain, urgent need to urinate, and the inability to control urine because of an urgent need to urinate.  Most symptoms were mild to moderate in severity and resolved within two to four weeks after the procedure.